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Program


Tuesday November 20, 2018
8:00-9:00 a.m. Participant registration and welcome

9:00-9:30 a.m.

Launch of the Grand Rally for our Little Ones


  • Konrad H. Sioui, Grand Chief of the Huron-Wendat Nation
  • Ghislain Picard, Chief of the Assembly of First Nations Quebec-Labrador and Ambassador for the Early Childhood Week
  • Lucie Champagne, Strategic consultant, Association québécoise des centres de la petite enfance, and Isabelle Lizée, Executive Director, Carrefour action municipale et famille, Co-chairs of the Early Childhood Week
  • Jean-Pierre Hotte, Chair, Board of Directors, Avenir d'enfants

9:30-10:30 a.m.

The current state of early childhood development in Québec – Plenary session
Comparative perspectives on progress made to date, remaining challenges, and opportunities in early childhood development

Presented by the Grand Rally for our Little Ones Scientific Committee

Co-chairs:

  • Julie Poissant, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Special Education and Training, UQAM
  • Sonia Daly, Consultant, Community support, Avenir d'enfants, and Ph.D. candidate in Community Psychology, UQAM

Members:


  • Fannie Dagenais, M.Sc., Director, Observatoire des tout-petits
  • Jean-Pierre Gagnier, Ph.D., Full Professor, Department of Psychology, UQTR
  • Catherine Haeck, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Economics, School of Management Sciences, UQAM
  • Paul Lewis, Ph.D., Full Professor, School of Urban Planning and Landscape Design, and Vice-Rector (Alumni Relations, Partnerships and Philanthropy), Université de Montréal
  • Bertrand Perron, Ph.D., Director, Longitudinal and Social Studies, ISQ, and trained sociologist
  • Alain Poirier, MD, Medical Officer, INSPQ, and Associate Professor, School of Public Health, Université de Montréal
  • Nibisha Sioui, Psy.D./Ph.D., Wendat and member of the Anishinabe Nation, clinical and community psychologist
  • Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay, Ph.D., Full Professor of Human Resources Management, School of Administrative Sciences, Université Téluq
10:30-11:00 a.m. Break

11:00-12:00 noon

Continued discussion about the current state of early childhood development in Québec – Plenary session
Comparative perspectives on progress made to date, remaining challenges, and opportunities in early childhood development

Presented by the Grand Rally for our Little Ones Scientific Committee

 12:00-1:30 p.m. Lunch

 1:30-3:00 p.m.

Taking action together for children and families – Small-group activities
Strategies underway to generate long-term changes

Choice of one topic:

1. Citizen participation 2.0: reimagining ourselves as a more effective collective force

Citizen participation, which has been around forever, can be expressed in many different ways. However, given the frantic pace of modern life, the prevalence of new technologies and the younger generations, citizen participation needs to be reimagined so it can be brought up to speed to changing trends and realities. Workshop participants will learn about recent citizen participation initiatives and discuss the benefits they produced as well as the winning conditions required to keep citizens engaged today and into the future.

Moderator:

Sonia Daly, Consultant, Community Support, Avenir d'enfants

Panelists:

  • Mustapha Bahri, Director, Comité de vie de quartier du Vieux-Gatineau (Vieux-Gatineau Neighbourhood Life Committee)
  • Natalie Beauvais, Executive Director at Step By Step Child and Family Center, Kahnawake
  • Mélanie Bourgeois, Committed citizen, woman and mother; Québec City
  • Mariloue Daudier, Social worker and Social Project Coordinator
  • Dominique Perrault, Director, Femmes-Relais; member of the Table enfance-famille de Saint-Michel à Montréal (Child and Family Services Roundtable in Saint-Michel, Montréal)

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2. Shared leadership: the challenge of bringing all stakeholders together

It goes without saying that committed leaders are crucial to any partnership. Shared leadership allows for the collective appropriation of problems and solutions, fosters a sense of commitment to concerted action among the partners, and encourages innovation. In this workshop, stakeholders involved in collective action will discuss what they have learned about shared leadership as well as the conditions that can help ensure that shared leadership can be maintained over time.

Moderators: 

  • France Brochu, Executive Director, Dynamo
  • Chantal Grandchamp, Strategic Consultant, Dynamo

Panelists :

  • Linda Bossé, Coordinator, Agir ensemble pour le développement des enfants
  • Julie Hartley, Regional Coordinator of Childcare Operations, Cree Child & Family Services Department, Cree Nation Government
  • Kelly Pepabano, Director Child & Family Services, Cree Nation Government
  • Diana Spencer-Blacksmith, regional Coordinator of Maamuu Uhpichinaausuutaau, Cree Nation Government

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3. Public policies: adapting the framework to local realities

Public programs, initiatives and policies constitute a framework that organizations and partners can adapt to their own realities. Some partners have mobilized to make use of this advantage to influence and set up more extensive collaborations and make a collective impact on local or regional problems. Workshop participants will become acquainted with examples of collective action based on a dialogue between community stakeholders and the bodies responsible for administering public policies.

Moderator:

  • Alain Poirier, MD, internal medicine specialist and public health expert, Institut national de santé publique du Québec

Panelists:

  • Carmelle Lefebvre, Assistant Director, Vie régionale, planification et expertise, Service de la culture, des loisirs, du sport et du développement social, Ville de Laval
  • Isabelle Lizée, Executive Director, Carrefour action municipale et famille
  • Christine Nantel, Executive Director, Maison de la famille des Pays-d’en-Haut
  • Patrick Paulin, City councillor in charge of social policies, Ville de Victoriaville
  • Marie Rhéaume, Executive Director, Réseau pour un Québec Famille
  • Nadine Rousselot, Early Childhood Sector Manager, First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission

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4. Funding: diversify, maximize and … be bold!

There are two advantages to funding sources diversification and the pooling of funds: On the one hand, we get to access the resources that enable us to pursue our common goals; on the other, we have an opportunity to influence the funding agencies towards making their funding practices better adapted to the needs of our communities. This workshop will showcase the expertise developed by stakeholders who have forged or influenced strategic alliances. You will find out what their recommendations are, how they dealt with challenges, and the benefits and changes they observed in their communities.

Moderators:

  • Maggie St-Georges, Guidance support worker and Regional liaison, Avenir d’enfants
  • Nadir Oliveira Dias, Guidance support worker, Avenir d’enfants

Panelists:

  • Patrick Bacon, Community Project Coordinator, First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission
  • Gérald Beaudry, Chair, Communauté ouverte et solidaire pour un monde outillé, scolarisé et en santé, COSMOSS Bas-Saint-Laurent
  • Julie Bickerstaff, Coordinator, Comité régional Opération Colibri, early childhood regional body – Montérégie
  • Mélanie Courtois, Social Development Coordinator, Mobilisation Uauitishitutau
  • Annie Goudreault, Director, Direction de la Montérégie, ministère de la Culture et des Communications
  • Carmen-Gloria Sanchez, Executive Director, Chamber of Commerce of Saint-Jérôme

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5. Communication and influence: getting to be known and recognized

Communication and influence are part of the process of making a mobilization of partners known, discussing its achievements, influencing decision-makers and rallying various stakeholders as well as the general public to its cause. What can we do and say to convince decision-makers? Workshop participants will get some answers to these key questions so as to ensure mobilization initiatives can be sustained. Examples of collective initiatives will be used to illustrate the strategies that have been implemented and to remind us of the importance of adapting our communications to the populations we are targeting. Finally, there will be an activity to allow workshop participants to reflect on the challenges associated with communication and influence.

Moderator:

  • Isabelle Quimper, Guidance support worker and Regional liaison, Avenir d’enfants

Panelists:

  • Valérie Couture, Director, La Constellation 0-5 ans
  • François Lagarde, Vice-President, Communications and Collective Engagement, Fondation Lucie et André Chagnon
  • Nathalie Walter, Project Manager, Groupe de Travail Montérégien - Orthophonie et développement du langage (GTM-ODL)

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6. Using data: going beyond statistics

Using data can be a powerful catalyst for rallying and maintaining commitment to a cause, such as the well-being of children and families. Not only can data have a persuasive effect, it can also serve to enhance the credibility of the initiatives undertaken by early childhood partners. To help illustrate this topic, specific experiences will be showcased. Workshop participants will be able to contribute to the discussions.

Moderator:

  • Olivier Tardif, Territory manager, Avenir d’enfants

Panelists:

  • Annie Bérubé, Professor, Department of Psychoeducation and Psychology, Université du Québec en Outaouais
  • Philippe Forté, Coordinator, Grandir ensemble
  • Jean-François Lapointe, Territory manager, Avenir d’enfants, partner of Horizon 0-5 and coordinator of the EQDEM initiative
  • Patricia Montambault, Research Agent, First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission
  • Aïda Ouédraogo, Project Manager, Evaluative culture, Abitibi-Témiscamingue

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7. Guidance: added value or compulsory step?

The guidance offered to organizations and groups of partners can take shape in a variety of ways and serve various purposes. This support measure is founded on several values: respect for the pace of partners, recognition of the forces in place, and capacity-building. However, above and beyond these basic principles, the guidance experience may prove to be either stimulating or limiting for the individuals involved. This workshop offers an opportunity for agencies providing guidance and partners who have received such guidance to discuss the added value as well as the challenges associated with this type of support.

Moderator:

  • Pierre Prévost, Consultant, Community Support, Avenir d’enfants

Panelists:


  • Claudia Bastien, Support worker – community projects, First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission
  • Stéphanie Fatou Courcy-Legros, Community organizer, Director of the youth and public health activities program, CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l ‘Île-de-Montréal, Chair of the Regroupement québécois des intervenants et intervenantes en action communautaire en CSSS
  • Natalie Kishchuk, Evaluator, Vice-President, Canadian Evaluation Society
  • Odette Morneau, Coordinator, Commun'Action 0-5 ans Saint-Sauveur and Saint-Roch
  • Sonia Racine, Collective Development Consultant, Communagir
  • Jenny Rock, Coordinator, Table de concertation Mamu Atussetau (Pessamit)
  • Étienne Soutière, Guidance support worker, Avenir d’enfants
3:00-3:30 p.m. Break

3:30-5:00 p.m.

Taking action together for children and families – Small-group activities
Strategies underway to generate long-term changes

Choice of a second topic:

  1. Citizen participation 2.0: reimagining ourselves as a more effective collective force
  2. Shared leadership: the challenge of bringing all stakeholders together
  3. Public policies: adapting the framework to local realities
  4. Funding: diversify, maximize and … be bold!
  5. Communication and influence: getting to be known and recognized
  6. Using data: going beyond statistics
  7. Guidance: added value or compulsory step?

6:00-7:30 p.m.

Presentation of the Hand in hand for our Little Ones campaign and Cocktail Reception

 
Wednesday November 21, 2018

8:30-10:30 a.m.

Municipalities and cities that live up to children’s needs - Conferences presented by Carrefour action municipale et famille

Quebecers are taking a greater interest in citizens’ quality of life and environmental planning. This trend is finding expression in municipal family policies and in the accreditation of child-friendly municipalities (“Municipalité amie des enfants”) that establish concrete initiatives. As these projects and expectations take shape and the trend towards greater powers for municipalities and cities is confirmed, Québec has arrived at a crossroads for contemplating its future. If we consider our municipalities and cities in terms of living up to the needs of children, shouldn’t we aim to enhance everyone’s quality of life, while setting our sights squarely on the future? Here are two inspirational presentations to help energize our ideas and prompt us to action.

  • A city for young children and parents,
    by Leonardo Yánez - Bernard Van Leer Foundation / Urban 95


    For several decades, we have been trying to ensure sound child development by advocating only for the provision of education and health services for children. Science has nevertheless shown how important the bonds are that young children form with their parents and the individuals looking after them.
    Moreover, there are several environmental factors that may either assist adults or prevent them from fully living up to their role towards children. Cities and municipalities have the power to act on the environments families live in. By following just a few recommendations, they can help support parents as well as individuals tasked with looking after children in their roles.

    • A member of the Bernard Van Leer Foundation team for over 20 years, Léonardo Yanèz is an early childhood development expert with extensive experience in local and municipal government partnerships.
  • Adapting urban development to suit children: lessons from Europe and Canada,
    by Tim Gill, Independent Scholar, Writer and Consultant on childhood


    What does a city truly adapted to the needs of children look like? Why is it important to consider cities through the eyes of a child? And how can advocates for this cause formulate convincing arguments that will win over decision-makers and the general public?

    • An independent consultant and long-time advocate for child-friendly urban planning and design, Tim Gill shines a light on the changing nature of children’s play and recreational activities and their evolving relationships with the people and places in their environment.
10:30-11:00 a.m. Break

11:00-12:00 noon

Braindate: to meet, to exchange, to learn collectively

12:00-1:30 p.m. Lunch

1:30-3:30 p.m.

Continuing the collective movement for advancing early childhood development – Plenary session

Discussion among participants about what they learned from the Grand Rally for our Little Ones activities and joint commitment

  This activity will also be webcast and it will be possible to listen to the recording later.

Early Childhood Week is an opportunity to raise awareness, promote dialogue and engage society about early childhood matters.